Why I Share Lectures on YouTube | Philip Emeagwali


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [Advanced Lectures in Supercomputing] I don’t want these lecture series
to be as detailed and as abstract as the series of lectures
—on massively parallel supercomputing— that I gave in the early 1990s
and gave to supercomputer scientists. In the early 1990s, I was appointed
as the Distinguished Speaker of the Association for Computing Machinery.
In the early 1990s, I was appointed as the Distinguished Visitor
of The Computer Society of the IEEE, the acronym
for The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
The IEEE is the largest technical society
in the world. I lectured in American universities
for the IEEE and I lectured
on massively parallel supercomputing. I was appointed
for a supercomputer lecture tour and as a Distinguished Speaker
of the Association for Computing Machinery. That association
was the premier society for computer professionals.
I lectured on how and why
extreme-scaled problems in algebra could be solved across
a new internet that was defined and outlined
by an ensemble of 64 binary thousand commodity-off-the-shelf processors
that were identical and that were equal distances
apart. I don’t want this lecture series
to be too abstract for non-mathematicians watching it online.
For that reason, I described the partial differential equations
that I invented in prose, rather than in partial derivatives.
Nor do I want my lectures to sound like lectures on how to solve
the quadratic equation of algebra and how to solve
the partial differential equations of calculus.
In my 1980s research lectures, I emphasized my theoretical process
over my experimental discovery of how to compute faster
and emphasized my research over my invention
and over my constructive reduction to practice
that reduced my global network of 65,536 processors
to my small copy of the Internet. Yet, in another sense,
my lectures were calculus lessons that were beyond calculus lessons.
They were the culmination of my sixteen-year-long
mathematical quest for how to solve
the partial differential equations of my new calculus
that encoded the laws of motion of physics.
The calculus not known was how to derive
on the blackboard closed-form solutions
to those system of coupled, non-linear, time-dependent, and state-of-the-art
partial differential equations. The calculus known
was how to derive on a single motherboard
the numerical solutions to the algebraic partial difference approximations
of those system of coupled, non-linear, time-dependent, and state-of-the-art
partial differential equations. The calculus known
was how to solve those partial differential equations
on the motherboard but solve them
with infinite time-to-solution. The calculus not known
was how to solve those partial differential
and difference equations and solve them across
my new internet. I visualized that new internet
as a global network of 65,536 commodity processors,
or as a global network of as many, identical computers.
I tried to keep the contents of my lectures
straightforward. I gave video-taped lectures
on what I discovered and invented. I explained my visions, my struggles,
and my Eureka! Moments. My scientific lectures
differ from daily classroom teachings of a body of scientific knowledge
that was discovered over the past five millennia
of recorded history that dates to the era
of the Pyramids in Africa. I want you to experience
my scientific lectures in a manner that is both visceral
and larger-than-life. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

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